A single global model can’t predict savanna tree density as well as continent-specific models, according to research published in Science this week. Photo of a South African savanna courtesy of Dr. William Hoffmann, a co-author of the study.

One size doesn’t fit all

A general cross-continent model to predict the effects of climate change on savanna vegetation isn’t as effective as examining individual savannas by continent, according to research published in Science this week.

Savannas – grasslands dotted with trees – cover about 20 percent of the earth’s land and play a critical role in storing atmospheric carbon, says Dr. William Hoffmann, associate professor of plant and microbial biology at North Carolina State University and co-author of the study. “We wanted to find out what controls savanna vegetation – essentially the density of trees within the savanna – and whether we can use a single global model to predict what will happen to savannas if global temperatures rise,” Hoffmann said.

read more >>

men in a cornfield

Centennial website provides news, information on Extension’s 100 years

Throughout 2014 as North Carolina Cooperative Extension celebrates its 100th birthday, watch for news and learn more about the organization through Extension’s centennial website: ncce100years.ces.ncsu.edu.

read more >>

North Carolina economy 2014

YOU DECIDE: Up, down or sideways — what direction for the economy in 2014?

N.C. State University economist Mike Walden looks into his economic crystal ball to tell us what to expect in 2014.

read more >>

Dr. Amy McLean, an expert in the behavior of donkeys and mules, travelled to Mexico in October to assist the Equitarian Initiative.

College Profile: Amy McLean

CALS equine specialist Dr. Amy McLean plays a key role in an international initiative to improve the health, welfare and productivity of working equids.

read more >>

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

BAE head Robert Evans named to the International Drainage Hall of Fame

Dr. Robert Evans of the NC State Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering receives the International Drainage Hall of Fame Award

Dr. Robert Evans, head of the college’s Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, recently was named to the International Drainage Hall of Fame.

Raulston Arboretum’s “Gala in the Garden” to celebrate North Carolina

Guests enjoying the Raulston Arboretum'sGala in the Garden

Delectable food, musical entertainment and a silent auction featuring unusual plants and an eclectic array of gift items will be showcased at the annual Gala in the Garden at the JC Raulston Arboretum at North Carolina State University. The public event will take place May 4 from 3:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Second annual Wolfpack Roundup auction exceeds success of inaugural year

CALS student Keith Kornegay shows one of the horses up for sale at the Wolfpack Roundup livestock auction, April 12.

The livestock merchandising class gives students the opportunity to learn about and handle livestock and gain hands-on experience planning for, promoting and conducting a livestock auction.

Study: Dan River water safe for irrigation, livestock

Using projections of water-quality trends based on hundreds of water analyses made during a 40-day period following the release of approximately 39,000 tons of coal ash into the Dan River on Feb. 2, 2014, North Carolina State University soil scientists conclude that the river water is suitable for use as irrigation water on crops and as drinking water for livestock. Researchers caution, however, that flooding, drought conditions or other episodic events in or around the river could change the conditions measurably.

N.C. State University leads research into kudzu bug host preferences

Kudzu bugs on a plant.

N.C. State University Extension Specialist Dominic Reisig wants to find a way to keep growers with kudzu bug problems out of the “spray continuum.” So he and his colleagues from South Carolina and Georgia will use a $168,644 U.S. Department of Agriculture Southern Regional IPM grant to find out why kudzu bugs leave their home in kudzu patches to move to soybean fields.

Almanac Gardener begins 31st season

Almanac Gardener, a weekly horticulture program of UNC-TV, began its 31st season on April 5. The weekly show features long-time host Mike Gray and N.C. Cooperative Extension horticulture agents sharing information and tips for home gardeners.

Economic Perspectives

Confusion from the Fed

New Fed Chair Janet Yellen recently held her first press conference. She was asked about rules or statistics the Fed would use to make decisions about changing interest rates. Some say Chairperson Yellen’s answer created more confusion than clarity, says host Mary Walden, who asks her husband, N.C. State University economist Mike Walden, “What happened?”

Privacy Statement | University Policies | Contact