Fall armyworm on a corn leaf

Something resistant this way comes: an insect mystery

In fall 2013, Dr. Dominic Reisig got a phone call from a farmer in rural Hyde County. The farmer was growing corn, and it was literally falling apart in the field. What was going on? Reisig, an entomologist at NC State University, is a sort of science detective who specializes in insects that pose a threat to crops. And the farmer had presented him with a mystery.

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Frank Jeter pioneered communications efforts at NC State, editing publications, writing newspaper and magazine articles and frequently hosting and speaking on radio news programs.

Jeter’s home run: First outreach communications at NC State

By the time North Carolina Cooperative Extension’s first agricultural editor Frank Jeter died in 1955, his name was a household word, reflecting his success over four decades in helping people convert new knowledge into more productive farming and happier rural living. The NC State College of Agriculture and Life Science’s communications team celebrated Frank Jeter’s legacy this week, marking 100 years since his hiring in November 1914.

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Corn maze from aerial view

Lee County corn maze honors Extension centennial

Gross Farms in Lee County has joined N.C. Cooperative Extension’s centennial celebration this fall. Guests to their agritourism operation can make their way through a 15-acre corn maze cut in the shape of Extension’s centennial logo.

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Sweetpotatoes

NC State receives grant to improve African sweet potatoes

North Carolina State University will receive $12.4 million over the next four years from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to improve a crop that is an important food staple in sub-Saharan Africa – the sweet potato.

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Bill Collins (left) and Windell Talley stand by the CALS Distinguished Alumni display.

Collins, Talley named 2014 CALS Distinguished Alumni

Also honored by CALS were Outstanding Alumni Award winners and recipients of the Young Alumni Award.

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Changing nighttime temperatures present new crop production challenge

Rice field

As nighttime temperatures rise faster than daytime temperatures, agricultural production faces a new challenge being explored by NC State University’s Dr. Colleen Doherty. Doherty, an assistant professor of Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, studies how plants perceive and respond to changing temperatures and other stressors that keep them from attaining optimal yields.

You Decide: What’s happening to the middle class?

Dr. Michael Walden is William Neal Reynolds professor of agricultural and resource economics at N.C. State University.

Mike Walden discusses why saving, protecting and even expanding the middle class may be the issue of the century.

Warmer temps limit parasites’ impact, boost pest populations

Metaphycus wasp

Climate change is expected to disrupt ecosystems by changing insects’ and other organisms’ life cycles in unpredictable ways -– and scientists are getting a preview of these changes in cities. NC State University research shows that some insect pests are thriving in warm, urban environments and developing earlier, limiting the impact of parasitoid wasps that normally help keep those pest populations in check.

NIFA chief delivers wide-sweeping seminar on challenges facing 21st century agriculture

Dr. Sonny Ramaswamy spoke at a agbiotechnology summit before deliving a Cooperative Extension seminar at NC State University.

Calling a booming world population “the mother of all wicked problems,” National Institute of Food and Agriculture Director Sonny Ramaswamy called upon an NC State University audience to press forward in their attempts to deliver on the promise of biophysical and social sciences in ensuring food security for a population expected to reach 9 billion by 2050.

Kim Allen receives professional award

Dr. Kimberly Allen

Dr. Kim Allen of NC State University’s Department of Youth, Family and Community Sciences has received a 2014 Center for Credentialing & Education professional development award from the NBCC Foundation, an affiliate of the National Board for Certified Counselors Inc.

Albertson named Agent of the Year

Amy-Lynn Albertson with three other people

Amy-Lynn Albertson has been named North Carolina Extension Agent of the Year by Carolina Farm Stewardship. The award was announced at the 2014 Sustainable Agriculture Conference held Nov. 10-12 in Greenville, S.C.

Economic Perspectives

Quantitative un-easing

The Federal Reserve took extraordinary steps to try to contain the negative effects of the recession. Does the Federal Reserve have to worry about how to move back from these steps now that the recession is past? N.C. State University economist Mike Walden responds.

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