Extension Agent Kevin Welch

Still the farmer’s best friend

Nowhere is NC State University’s reach into every corner of the state more evident than through the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service.

read more >>

Linda Hanley-Bowdoin

Improving the cassava plant

Cassava is Africa’s number two crop and a major source of calories for 700 million people, but it’s highly susceptible to pathogens such as cassava mosaic disease. With African colleagues and students, Dr. Linda Hanley-Bowdoin of NC State University’s College of Agriculture conducts basic research aimed at gaining a better basic molecular-level understanding of viruses and how they affect cassava.

read more >>

Fall armyworm on a corn leaf.

Something resistant this way comes: an insect mystery

In fall 2013, Dr. Dominic Reisig got a phone call from a farmer in rural Hyde County. The farmer was growing corn, and it was literally falling apart in the field. What was going on? Reisig, an entomologist at NC State University, is a sort of science detective who specializes in insects that pose a threat to crops. And the farmer had presented him with a mystery.

read more >>

Frank Jeter and others on NBC radio

Jeter’s home run: First outreach communications at NC State

By the time North Carolina Cooperative Extension’s first agricultural editor Frank Jeter died in 1955, his name was a household word, reflecting his success over four decades in helping people convert new knowledge into more productive farming and happier rural living. The NC State College of Agriculture and Life Science’s communications team celebrated Frank Jeter’s legacy this week, marking 100 years since his hiring in November 1914.

read more >>

Grant will help researchers improve sweetpotatoes, a staple crop in Sub-Saharan Africa.

NC State receives grant to improve African sweet potatoes

North Carolina State University will receive $12.4 million over the next four years from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to improve a crop that is an important food staple in sub-Saharan Africa – the sweet potato.

read more >>

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

You Decide: What will 2015’s economy look like?

Dr. Michael Walden is William Neal Reynolds professor of agricultural and resource economics at N.C. State University.

Dr. Mike Walden highlights the key barometers of the economy and where he sees them headed in 2015.

Steward of the Future: Rodolphe Barrangou

Rodolphe Barrangou

A DNA cutting technology has changed the world of genetic studies, advancing food and agriculture, biotechnology and medical industries. In this short video, Dr. Rodolphe Barrangou discusses the CRISPR technology used in his lab in the Department of Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences.

NC State buddleia recognized by gardening group

Buddleia bush

A pink buddleia developed by Dr. Dennis Werner, JC Raulston Distinguished Professor of Horticultural Science at NC State University, received one of two 2015 Green Thumb Awards from the Direct Gardening Association.

ESP tours environmental farming center during annual meeting

Group at the farm

Cows, calves and hoop houses were among the attractions at the Center for Environmental Farming Systems, as North Carolina’s Chapter of Epsilon Sigma Phi toured the center last month. The tour was part of ESP Xi Chapter’s annual meeting, held over lunch at the extension center in nearby Johnston County.

Steward of the Future: David Tarpy

David Tarpy

“If it weren’t for honeybees and other pollinators, we wouldn’t have about a third of everything that we eat,” explains Dr. David Tarpy, a North Carolina State University entomologist. In this video, he explains his research on the genomics of honeybee queen development and their reproductive potential. It’s research with important implications for the future of food production.

NIFA chief delivers wide-sweeping seminar on challenges facing 21st century agriculture

Dr. Sonny Ramaswamy spoke at a agbiotechnology summit before deliving a Cooperative Extension seminar at NC State University.

Calling a booming world population “the mother of all wicked problems,” National Institute of Food and Agriculture Director Sonny Ramaswamy called upon an NC State University audience to press forward in their attempts to deliver on the promise of biophysical and social sciences in ensuring food security for a population expected to reach 9 billion by 2050.

Economic Perspectives

Pacific power

The United States sits between Europe and Asia, but traditionally our focus and ties have been in Europe. Now many say our future focus and ties will be in the other direction – to Asia. North Carolina State University economist Mike Walden explains why.

Privacy Statement | University Policies | Contact