Archive for the ‘Economic Perspective’ Category

Where college degrees pay off more

It’s well known that financial benefits to a college degree differ for different college majors. And N.C. State University economist Mike Walden says that a recent study by the Federal Reserve Bank shows that the cash value of that degree varies by where the graduate chooses to live.

Who holds our debt?

The national debt is becoming a bigger and bigger issue. The debt represents money the U.S. government owes to someone. N.C. State University economist Mike Walden defines who “someone” is.

Small business outlook

A strong argument can be made that our economy is really run by small businesses. Often the economic conditions for large and small businesses differ. So what are small businesses saying about the economy? Are they more or less optimistic? N.C. State University economist Mike Walden answers.

Moving back with parents

With the condition of today’s economy, are more young adults living with their parents? N.C. State University economist Mike Walden discusses the trends over time.

Containing health care costs

The two big federally supported health care programs Medicare and Medicaid are growing at fast rates. Any plan to reduce the relative size of the national debt will have to address these programs. N.C. State University economist Mike Walden talks about some new ideas that have been offered.

Rising gas prices

Just as we are beginning to get some good news about the economy and jobs, up rises the ugly head of higher gas prices. Why are gas prices going up? N.C. State University economist Mike Walden says it’s because demand is greater.

The velocity of money

What does it mean when economists talk about the velocity of money? Are they talking about something like the speed of money? N.C. State University economist Mike Walden answers.

Does North Carolina follow Hauser’s Law?

Host Mary Walden tells N.C. State University economist Mike Walden, “I know North Carolina often implements new laws at the beginning of the year, but I don’t remember any recent one being called Hauser’s law. I have a sneaky suspicion the law you are talking about isn’t the legal kind. Am I right?”

What’s happened to total debt?

Everyone knows the federal government has borrowed a tremendous amount of money over the past couple of years. So why are interest rates still low? N.C. State University economist Mike Walden responds.

Raising the debt limit

Periodically Congress and the President must agree to increase the country’s debt limit to allow the government to continue borrowing money. Every time this issue arises, it sparks intense debate. What would happen if the debt limit were not increased? N.C. State University economist Mike Walden answers.

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