Health and the Environment Experts

Date posted: August 17, 2010

A sound environment is essential for human health. In the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, most faculty members are, in some way, working to make the world a cleaner, healthier place. Here, we list just those faculty members who study human diseases related to the environment and those directly working to keep known human pathogens out of the environment.

Aziz Amoozegar
Professor
Soil Science
919-515-3967
aziz_amoozegar@ncsu.edu

Understanding decentralized wastewater treatment and the fate and transport of microbial and chemical pollutants from human and animal waste with goal of developing guidelines and techniques that make the land application of waste safer

Carl Crozier
Professor
Soil Science
252-793-4428
carl_crozier@ncsu.edu

Understanding the fate of raw manures, composts and novel products derived from animal wastes and accompanying management practices to protect environmental and human health

Owen Duckworth
Assistant Professor
Soil Science
919-513-1577
owen_duckworth@ncsu.edu

Understanding the fate and transport of microbial and chemical pollutants in land application of waste products; the bioavailability of metals from coal fly ash; and how biomolecules increase the solubility of toxic metals

Alexandria Graves
Assistant Professor
Soil Science
919-513-0635
alexandria_graves@ncsu.edu

Soil and environmental microbiology research, including using antibiotic-resistance genes to determine sources of fecal pollution in surface waters and groundwater

Amy Grunden
Associate Professor
Microbiology
919-513-4295
amy_grunden@ncsu.edu

Investigation of extremophile genes for bio-decontamination of toxic organophosphorus in some pesticides and chemical warfare agents and to improve stress resistance in crop plants such as tomato

Dean Hesterberg
Professor
Soil Science
919-513-3035
dean_hesterberg@ncsu.edu

Development of ways to prevent toxic and carcinogenic chemical contaminants from entering the human food chain and drinking water supplies and discovery of fundamental mechanisms of phosphorus binding in soils to protect water quality

Ernest Hodgson
Distinguished Professor Emeritus
Environmental and Molecular Toxicology
919-515-5295
ernest_hodgson@ncsu.edu

Investigation of human metabolism of xenobiotics

Mike Hoover
Professor
Soil Science
919.515.7305
mike_hoover@ncsu.edu

Development of small-scale water and wastewater reuse systems, field assessment of pathogen impacts of those systems and development of related national standards

Michael Hyman
Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Programs
Microbiology
919.515.7814
michael_hyman@ncsu.edu

Investigation of biodegradation of environmental pollutants such as chlorinated solvents and hydrocarbons such as crude oil and gasoline; many of the studied compounds are toxic to humans and are recognized or likely human carcinogens

Gerald LeBlanc
Professor and Department Head
Environmental and Molecular Toxicology
919-515-7404
ga_leblanc@ncsu.edu

Development and validation of models for evaluating the cumulative health effects of chemical mixtures in the environment

David Lindbo
Professor
Soil Science
919-515-2635
david_lindbo@ncsu.edu

Understanding decentralized wastewater management system functioning and the fate and transport of nutrients and microbial and chemical pollutants from land-applied biosolids to protect water quality

Scott McCulloch
Assistant Professor
Environmental and Molecular Toxicology
919-513-1214
scott_mcculloch@ncsu.edu

Investigation of the role of DNA polymerases in mutagenesis, specifically those mutations resulting from exposure to genotoxic insults

Deanna Osmond
Professor and Department Extension Leader
Soil Science
919.515.7303
deanna_osmond@ncsu.edu

Research and outreach to protect the environment and human health through agricultural practices that reduce pollutants

Heather Patisaul
Assistant Professor
Biology
919-513-7567
heather_patisaul@ncsu.edu

Examination of the steroid-dependent mechanisms through which sexually dimorphic behaviors and brain circuits arise and the mechanism by which sexually dimorphic systems and behaviors can be disrupted by environmental estrogens, particularly mechanisms by which exposure to estrogens can advance puberty and impair fertility in females

Michael Vepraskas
Professor
Soil Science
919-515-1458
michael_vepraskas@ncsu.edu

Research on climate change’s potential impact on septic systems; wetlands restoration for water quality; and fate and transport of microbial and chemical pollutants in land-applied waste disposal>

Andrew Wallace
Assistant Professor
Environmental and Molecular Toxicology
919-515-8520
andrew_wallace@ncsu.edu

Investigation of the role of nuclear receptor signaling in human diseases of environmental etiology

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