Temple Grandin to address Carolina Meat Conference, Dec. 3

Date posted: November 27, 2012

Temple GrandinTemple Grandin will speak at the Carolina Meat Conference.

Media contact: Casey McKissick, casey@ncchoices.com or 828.216.2966

Dr. Temple Grandin, renown designer of humane livestock facilities, will be the keynote speaker at the second Carolina Meat Conference, Dec. 3, at the WinMock Dairy and Event Center in Bermuda Run, west of Winston-Salem. The conference, Dec. 3-4, is hosted by NC Choices, a program that promotes sustainable and niche meat production.

The conference and dinner are sold out, but media are invited to cover Grandin’s keynote address or other portions of the meat conference. To request press passes, contact Casey McKissick, casey@ncchoices.com or call 828.216.2966.

The Carolina Meat Conference, a gathering of industry professionals from all sectors of the local and niche meat industry, for two days of panel discussions, presentations, workshops, live demonstrations and a trade show.

Grandin, professor of animal science at Colorado State University, is one of the world’s leaders in animal behavior and the design of livestock handling facilities. Though Grandin didn’t speak until she was 4 years old, she went on to change how the world thinks about autism and how the meat industry handles livestock. Grandin’s innovations in the meat processing and livestock industry have helped producers and packers minimize animal and handler stress, resulting in higher meat quality and worker safety and satisfaction throughout the supply chain.

The 2010 release of HBO’s Temple Grandin chronicles her early life and received seven Emmy awards, a Golden Globe and a Peabody Award. Grandin has appeared on broadcast news shows and has been featured in many national publications. She was named one of Time magazine’s Most Influential People in the World.

The Carolina Meat Conference offers an opportunity for members of North Carolina’s growing niche meat industry to learn and network with livestock, meat and food professionals regarding best practices in meat production, processing, marketing and regulation.

Now in its second year, the Carolina Meat Conference has received national attention for its program content and its role in encouraging rural economic development in North Carolina. North Carolina’s farmers, processors, chefs and food entrepreneurs are regarded as among the most innovative in the country.

Attendees of the conference may choose from the workshops offered throughout the event, with the exception of a few hands-on sessions for home butchers and professional chefs. An abbreviated agenda is listed below. For more information about the Carolina Meat Conference, visit the conference website at www.carolinameatconference.com.

Schedule at a Glance
• Tools for Growing Your Meat Processing Business • Effectively Marketing Meat from Heritage Breed Animals • Butchery Craft in the Home Kitchen • Wholesale Buyers Advancing Local Meat • Fundamentals of Low-Stress Animal Handling with Dr. Temple Grandin • Providing Exemplary Customer Service in a Small Plant • It’s Hard to be a Hotdog in a Ground Meat World- The Challenges of Small Batch Cured, Cooked, and Smoked Value Added Products in Small Plants • Cured Meats in Retail Butcher Shops and Food Service Establishments- New Laws • Meat Processors: Want to Know Why You Are (or Are Not) Making Money and What to Do About It? • Controlling Inputs in Pasture-Based Livestock Production • Women in the Meat Business • Confessions of a Former Pasture Meat Farmer • Renaissance of the Retail Butcher Shop • Growing Local Meat Supply Chains with Integrity and more.

The Carolina Meat Conference is a program of NC Choices. NC Choices is a Center for Environmental Farming Systems’ (CEFS) initiative that promotes the advancement of local and niche meat supply chains in North Carolina through networking, educational programming and technical assistance for producers, processors and buyers. CEFS is a non-profit partnership of N.C. State University, N.C. A&T State University and the N.C. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

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