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Features

Modernizing Food Safety

Farm Bureau's Debbie Hamrick, shown at the State Farmers Market in Raliegh, are part of the group that has helped guide the rules process for the food safety act.

It’s been called the biggest change to food safety and farming practices in modern history. And though it’s been more two and a half years since the Food Safety Modernization Act was signed into law, there is still much work to be done. The good news is that in North Carolina, organizations that support agriculture haven’t been sitting on their hands. Groups like CALS, the N.C. Farm Bureau and the N.C. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services have been active in helping to shape regulations and educate growers on how the Food Safety Modernization Act will affect the way they do business.

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Speaking of Extension

Dreams, knowledge, education, skills, experience, expertise, solutions

North Carolina Cooperative Extension clients statewide tell how Extension is empowering them and providing solutions that have improved their lives.

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Unique Reflections

At 96, Dick Thompson reflects on his memories of Yates Mill and the process that led to its restoration.

Dick Thompson ’39 was a sophomore at N.C. State when he first saw Yates Mill. His visit there brought back memories of grist mills he’d seen as a child. And it inspired his commitment to the mill and surrounding land, now a historic site and Wake County park.

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Relevant Research

Miranda Ganci, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences graduate student in plant pathology, has a clear vision of her future career. “I see myself working as an extension agent in order to assist growers with disease identification and management,” she says. “Additionally, I am interested in working in the crop protection industry in a role in which I could assist plant breeders with developing disease resistance in crops.” She’s already playing that role. Ganci, who is from Hickory and expects to receive her N.C. State University master’s degree in 2014, is studying ways to design mitigation strategies against box blight, an aggressive disease that threatens the economic viability of the boxwood industry.

CALS graduate students address important issues and blaze paths to future careers with their GSRS research projects.

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College Profile: Danesha Seth Carley

Danesha Seth Carley set out to build a program that would facilitate partnerships, raise awareness of the College's sustainability efforts and serve as an information clearing house on sustainability.

With an ecologist’s heart and mind, Danesha Seth Carley helps lead the College’s sustainability programs.

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Noteworthy News

Gould is Borlaug Award winner

Dr. Fred Gould, center, received the 2013 Borlaug Award. He is pictured with CALS Dean Richard Linton, left, and College of Natural Resources Dean Mary Watzin.

Preserving international forests, providing food security and addressing issues of global climate change will require a coordinated effort, Frances Seymour, former director of the Center for International Forestry Research in Indonesia, told an audience at N.C. State University’s 2013 Borlaug Lecture. And before the lecture, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences entomologist Dr. Fred Gould received the Borlaug Excellence in Service to Society and the Environment Award.

CALS scientist honored as emerging scholar

conducting research to prevent and manage porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome. The viral syndrome costs the U.S. pork industry millions each year.

Dr. Julie Hicks, a postdoctoral scholar and recent Ph.D. degree recipient from N.C. State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, recently won a top regional award for her research into the molecular-level processes involved in one of the world’s most important swine diseases.

Graduate student’s discovery can enable tick population management

Ann Carr's tick attractant research was featured earlier this year in the journal Medical and Veterinary Entomology.

Doctoral student Ann Carr is hard at work developing ways to attract ticks so that the general population can avoid them.
Under the direction of Department of Entomology professors Dr. Charles Apperson, Dr. Michael Roe and Dr. Coby Schal, Carr recently discovered that two chemicals – acetone and ammonium hydroxide – attract high numbers of the tick species Amblyomma americanum. The development of this chemical cocktail could open new doors for the screening and management of tick populations in North Carolina and beyond.

Dean from Liberian university visits CALS

Mulbah and Jordan

At Cuttington University in Liberia, the College of Agriculture and Sustainable Development is slowly coming back to life, thanks in part to support from and involvement by several faculty members from N.C. State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

CALS students work with AgrAbility to help create ‘hallelujah moments’

Students from the CALS Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering have partnered with N.C. AgrAbility in creating a solar-powered hydraulic water delivery system to assist a Macon County farmer.

Pam Martin’s organic vegetable farm is her livelihood. But a respiratory disease and diabetes make it difficult for the Macon County farmer to work for longer than 15 minutes at a time. One of her biggest struggles? Dragging a hose 50 to 100 yards from her house to water the garden and nourish her chickens and horses. Enter the North Carolina AgrAbility Partnership.

Farm Animal Days draws nearly 10,000

Kids cuddled bunnies and other animals during Farm Animal Days, which the Wake County Farm Bureau sponsors.

Neither rainy weather nor muddy fields could keep the crowds away from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences’ annual Farm Animal Days event, designed to give children an up-close-and-personal experience with animal agriculture.

No small beer: N.C. State Brewery teaches the process and the science of beer making

Dr. John Sheppard, shown at the N.C. State Brewery in Schaub Hall, holds a glass of one of the microbrews made there.

A small brewery in the basement of Schaub Hall at N.C. State University is making a big name for itself on campus.

Dr. John Sheppard, professor in the Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences Department, has been brewing beer since he came to the university seven years ago, and now the N.C. State Brewery provides various microbrews for events on campus through University Dining.

Jefferson Scholars study ocean sciences, island species, local culture in Bermuda

Jefferson Scholars in Bermuda

The Thomas Jefferson Scholars recently traveled to Bermuda, as part of the program’s inaugural international learning trip. The participants are N.C. State University students seeking dual degrees in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

The dean’s ice cream is . . .

Picture of Dean Richard Linton and Dr. Joe Zublena serving ice cream.

The votes have been counted, and Dean Richard Linton’s official Howling Cow ice cream is . . .

Postdoctoral program aims for greater faculty diversity

Picture of Dr. Terrence Gardner and Dr. Owen Duckworth

When Dr. Terrence Gardner was hired, he became the first African-American postdoctoral researcher in the College in nearly a decade, which is why the Dean’s Postdoctoral Fellowship was created. The fellowship provides outstanding scholars from underrepresented groups with an opportunity that might not otherwise be available.

Noteworthy Alumni

A passion for his work takes Cal Lewis to the state growers’ Hall of Fame

Cal Lewis holds a box of his blackberries grown through high-tunnel production -- one of the innovative and progressive growing methods Lewis Nursery and Farms Inc. uses.

With his innovative and progressive style, alumnus Cal Lewis has been named to the N.C. Vegetable Growers Association’s Hall of Fame.

Brubaker honored for career and service to the state, university and FFA

N.C. Sen. Daniel Blue Jr. (left) and N.C. Speaker of the House Thom Tillis were among those paying tribute to former N.C. Speaker of the House Brubaker (center).

The career impacts and legacy of former North Carolina Speaker of the House Harold Brubaker were celebrated March 27 at a special event co-hosted by the N.C. Agricultural Foundation Inc. and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at N.C. State University.

Mark your calendars for the next CALS Career Expo on Feb. 11, 2014

CALS student discusses careers with a potential employer at the 2012 Career Expo.

The Expo showcases full-time jobs, internships and volunteer opportunities, but it is also a chance to educate students about organizations and opportunities that may be available in the future.

CALS alumnus directs the Northeast Regional School of Biotechnology and Agriscience

Hal Davis, CALS alumnus and principal of the new early college high school

With six teachers and 58 students (at press time), the Northeast Regional School of Biotechnology and Agriscience may be small, but it’s mighty. Principal Hal Davis, a CALS alumnus, says this school is like no other.

CALS to host end of summer tailgate

N.C. State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences will host its annual Tailgate on Saturday, Aug. 31, at Dorton Arena at the N.C. State Fairgrounds in Raleigh. The event will be an end of summer party, held from 9 a.m. to noon before the 12:30 p.m. kickoff of the N.C. State vs. Louisiana Tech football game.

Noteworthy Giving

Past CALS deans honored at joint foundations expanded spring event

Reunion at Patterson Hall: Drs. Durward Bateman, James Oblinger, Richard Linton and Johnny Wynne gather to unveil the plaque honoring CALS leaders.

“Bridging the past to the future” was the theme when boards of foundations supporting N.C. State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences convened for a particularly special and historic joint meeting on April 10.

Transforming the Future celebrated at CALS annual donor recognition

Melda and Bill Lamm endowed the scholarship won by CALS senior David Horne (right), who joined them at the donor recognition event.

A snowy weekend did not daunt the more than 400 guests who attended the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences’ annual donor recognition event, Feb. 17. Among the hundreds assembled at N.C. State University’s McKimmon Center for the occasion were CALS donors, scholarship and professorship recipients, faculty members, alumni and students, along with university administrators.

2013 Arb Gala is an elegant Asian Reflection

Gala-goers place their bids in a silent-auction tent. Proceeds support the JCRA's operations, plant maintenance and educational programs.

The April 28 Gala in the Garden, the annual garden party and fundraiser at JC Raulston Arboretum, came with cool temperatures and April showers, yet it was as magical and beautiful as ever. This year’s theme was “An Asian Reflection.”

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