CALS Poultry Science, Richmond Community College partner in 2+2 program

Date posted: April 4, 2011

From left are Dr. Scott Ralls, N.C .Community College system president; Dr. Dale McInnis, RCC president; Dr. Ken Esbenshade, CALS Academic Programs director; Dr. Johnny Wynne, CALS dean; and Dr. Samuel Pardue, CALS Poultry Science Department head.Photo courtesy Anne Morris, RCCFrom left are Dr. Scott Ralls, N.C .Community College system president; Dr. Dale McInnis, RCC president; Dr. Ken Esbenshade, CALS Academic Programs director; Dr. Johnny Wynne, CALS dean; and Dr. Samuel Pardue, CALS Poultry Science Department head.

On March 24, N.C. State University’s Department of Poultry Science and Richmond Community College signed an agreement that allows specific RCC associate in science degree graduates admission as juniors into the NCSU poultry science program. Called a “2+2” program, it guarantees N.C. State enrollment for RCC students who have earned a two-year associate’s degree including the courses required for N.C. State’s poultry science baccalaureate program and have maintained an adequate GPA.

RCC President Dr. Dale McInnis said the 64-hour program consists of a list of rigorous courses ranging from microbiology and organic chemistry to calculus and trigonometry.  Students must graduate with a 3.0 grade point average to qualify to enter N.C. State.

Attending from N.C. State were Dr. Johnny Wynne, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences dean; Dr. Ken Esbenshade, CALS associate dean and Academic Programs director; and Dr. Sam Pardue, CALS Poultry Science Department head. Pardue said the program is one of only six in the nation and is designed to serve the needs of North Carolina’s poultry industry, which is the largest commodity in the state’s agribusiness economy.

“Thirty-seven percent of farm-generated products have feathers,” he said. “After you take the product to the table, it’s estimated that $12 billion is generated in the state. We are pleased this agreement provides students affordable access to an education where they can find employment. While there are jobs as liaisons between the growers and the companies, the bulk of job opportunities are in the areas of processing, food safety and food quality.”

Along with local officials and industry representatives, also present was Richard Goforth, the area poultry agent for Cooperative Extension.

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