Posts Tagged ‘academic programs’

CALS scientist honored as emerging scholar

conducting research to prevent and manage porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome. The viral syndrome costs the U.S. pork industry millions each year.

Dr. Julie Hicks, a postdoctoral scholar and recent Ph.D. degree recipient from N.C. State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, recently won a top regional award for her research into the molecular-level processes involved in one of the world’s most important swine diseases.

Graduate student’s discovery can enable tick population management

Ann Carr's tick attractant research was featured earlier this year in the journal Medical and Veterinary Entomology.

Doctoral student Ann Carr is hard at work developing ways to attract ticks so that the general population can avoid them.
Under the direction of Department of Entomology professors Dr. Charles Apperson, Dr. Michael Roe and Dr. Coby Schal, Carr recently discovered that two chemicals – acetone and ammonium hydroxide – attract high numbers of the tick species Amblyomma americanum. The development of this chemical cocktail could open new doors for the screening and management of tick populations in North Carolina and beyond.

CALS students work with AgrAbility to help create ‘hallelujah moments’

Students from the CALS Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering have partnered with N.C. AgrAbility in creating a solar-powered hydraulic water delivery system to assist a Macon County farmer.

Pam Martin’s organic vegetable farm is her livelihood. But a respiratory disease and diabetes make it difficult for the Macon County farmer to work for longer than 15 minutes at a time. One of her biggest struggles? Dragging a hose 50 to 100 yards from her house to water the garden and nourish her chickens and horses. Enter the North Carolina AgrAbility Partnership.

Mark your calendars for the next CALS Career Expo on Feb. 11, 2014

CALS student discusses careers with a potential employer at the 2012 Career Expo.

The Expo showcases full-time jobs, internships and volunteer opportunities, but it is also a chance to educate students about organizations and opportunities that may be available in the future.

Relevant Research

Miranda Ganci, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences graduate student in plant pathology, has a clear vision of her future career. “I see myself working as an extension agent in order to assist growers with disease identification and management,” she says. “Additionally, I am interested in working in the crop protection industry in a role in which I could assist plant breeders with developing disease resistance in crops.” She’s already playing that role. Ganci, who is from Hickory and expects to receive her N.C. State University master’s degree in 2014, is studying ways to design mitigation strategies against box blight, an aggressive disease that threatens the economic viability of the boxwood industry.

CALS graduate students address important issues and blaze paths to future careers with their GSRS research projects.

CALS alumnus directs the Northeast Regional School of Biotechnology and Agriscience

Hal Davis, CALS alumnus and principal of the new early college high school

With six teachers and 58 students (at press time), the Northeast Regional School of Biotechnology and Agriscience may be small, but it’s mighty. Principal Hal Davis, a CALS alumnus, says this school is like no other.

No small beer: N.C. State Brewery teaches the process and the science of beer making

Dr. John Sheppard, shown at the N.C. State Brewery in Schaub Hall, holds a glass of one of the microbrews made there.

A small brewery in the basement of Schaub Hall at N.C. State University is making a big name for itself on campus.

Dr. John Sheppard, professor in the Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences Department, has been brewing beer since he came to the university seven years ago, and now the N.C. State Brewery provides various microbrews for events on campus through University Dining.

Stopping aggressive boxwood blight

Miranda Ganci is researching management strategies for boxwood blight, an agressive disease that threatens the economic viability of the boxwood industry.

Miranda Ganci has a clear vision of her future career. “I see myself working as an extension agent in order to assist growers with disease identification and management,” she says. “Additionally, I am interested in working in the crop protection industry in a role in which I could assist plant breeders with developing disease resistance in crops.” She’s already playing that role.

Student Perspectives: Diane Silcox

Diane Silcox examines turfgrass for hunting billbug damage.

National award-winning Ph.D. student Diane Silcox is developing biological solutions with economic savings for managing damage from the hunting billbug, a relatively new pest in North Carolina’s warm-season turf.

Berryhill endowment will support CALS students from Person County

Eugene C. Berryhill Sr.

The Eugene C. Berryhill Sr. Scholarship endowment was established in the North Carolina Agricultural Foundation Inc. in May.

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