Posts Tagged ‘entomology’

N.C. State University leads research into kudzu bug host preferences

Kudzu bugs on a plant.

N.C. State University Extension Specialist Dominic Reisig wants to find a way to keep growers with kudzu bug problems out of the “spray continuum.” So he and his colleagues from South Carolina and Georgia will use a $168,644 U.S. Department of Agriculture Southern Regional IPM grant to find out why kudzu bugs leave their home in kudzu patches to move to soybean fields.

Brevard high school students’ research wins accolades

Brevard sophomores Abby Williams and Carly Onnink conducted a study of kudzu bug pheromones.

Through a 4-H-public schools partnership in Transylvania County, Brevard High School sophomores Abby Williams and Carly Onnink conducted the type of research that professors says they expect to find in a university laboratory. Their topic: kudzu bug pheromones.

Gould is Borlaug Award winner

Dr. Fred Gould, center, received the 2013 Borlaug Award. He is pictured with CALS Dean Richard Linton, left, and College of Natural Resources Dean Mary Watzin.

Preserving international forests, providing food security and addressing issues of global climate change will require a coordinated effort, Frances Seymour, former director of the Center for International Forestry Research in Indonesia, told an audience at N.C. State University’s 2013 Borlaug Lecture. And before the lecture, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences entomologist Dr. Fred Gould received the Borlaug Excellence in Service to Society and the Environment Award.

Graduate student’s discovery can enable tick population management

Ann Carr's tick attractant research was featured earlier this year in the journal Medical and Veterinary Entomology.

Doctoral student Ann Carr is hard at work developing ways to attract ticks so that the general population can avoid them.
Under the direction of Department of Entomology professors Dr. Charles Apperson, Dr. Michael Roe and Dr. Coby Schal, Carr recently discovered that two chemicals – acetone and ammonium hydroxide – attract high numbers of the tick species Amblyomma americanum. The development of this chemical cocktail could open new doors for the screening and management of tick populations in North Carolina and beyond.

Student Perspectives: Diane Silcox

Diane Silcox examines turfgrass for hunting billbug damage.

National award-winning Ph.D. student Diane Silcox is developing biological solutions with economic savings for managing damage from the hunting billbug, a relatively new pest in North Carolina’s warm-season turf.

Fred Gould named to Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources

Fred Gould

Dr. Fred Gould, William Neal Reynolds Professor in the Department of Entomology, is one of two North Carolina State University faculty members named to the Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources, a major program unit of the National Research Council.

Study sheds light on invasive fruit pest

Spotted-wing vinegar fly on raspberry.

Humans aren’t the only species with a sweet tooth. N.C. State University researchers and Extension specialists have found that the invasive spotted-wing vinegar fly (Drosophila suzukii) also prefers sweet, soft fruit. Their study sheds new light on a species that has spread across the United States over the past four years and threatens to cause hundreds of millions of dollars in damage to U.S. fruit crops.

On the front lines of an invasion

Hannah Burrack

A new invasive pest from Asia likes fruits and berries as much as you do. A Cooperative Extension entomologist at is working to stop the hungry fruit fly, or at least slow it down. Read more in N.C. State’s Bulletin.

Pest management

Emily Meineke

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Environmental Expertise: Pest Management

Emily Meineke: Scaling up research on tiny pest

Emily Meineke

Will climate change make scale insects more abundant? That’s one of the questions Ph.D. student Emily Meineke is trying to answer as she studies these tiny — and abundant — pests.

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