Posts Tagged ‘food safety’

Chapman requests photos for citizen food safety project

Brats with thermometer

What can we learn about food safety, through the eyes of people fixing dinner at home, shopping at the farmers market or dining in a restaurant? That’s what Dr. Ben Chapman, assistant professor and food safety extension specialist at N.C. State University, set out to find out with a new citizen food safety project.

Searching for Salmonella

Pictrue of Diane Ducharme sampling tomatoes.

A team of North Carolina State University scientists is looking for Salmonella on tomatoes and around tomato production areas. What they find could help farmers grow tomatoes that have a decreased likelihood of carrying Salmonella.

Modernizing Food Safety

Farm Bureau's Debbie Hamrick, shown at the State Farmers Market in Raliegh, are part of the group that has helped guide the rules process for the food safety act.

It’s been called the biggest change to food safety and farming practices in modern history. And though it’s been more two and a half years since the Food Safety Modernization Act was signed into law, there is still much work to be done. The good news is that in North Carolina, organizations that support agriculture haven’t been sitting on their hands. Groups like CALS, the N.C. Farm Bureau and the N.C. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services have been active in helping to shape regulations and educate growers on how the Food Safety Modernization Act will affect the way they do business.

N.C. State, UT scientists received grant to improve produce safety

Cantaloupe washing station

KANNAPOLIS – A group of scientists at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture and North Carolina State University are working together to improve the safety of organic produce – naturally. Their study, “Alternative Post-harvest Washing Solutions to Enhance the Microbial Safety and Quality of Organic Fresh Produce,” began last fall.

Pilot program focuses on food safety in cantaloupes

Cantaloupes at a packing plant

Fresh produce safety is the focus of a pilot cantaloupe program being offered by North Carolina Cooperative Extension and the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

Food safety expert talks turkey

Holiday food safety tips

With turkey roasting, a few simple steps will go a long way when it comes to food safety. In a new infosheet and through four short videos, North Carolina Cooperative Extension food safety expert Benjamin Chapman gives tips on thawing a turkey, cooking it and saving leftovers.

Session allows agents to ask produce safety questions

Cooperative Extension agents can have their questions about fresh produce safety answered during an Elluminate webinar, July 12, 10 a.m. The webinar will mostly be about Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs), GAPs audits, the Food Safety Modernization Act and any other fresh produce safety related questions. It will be hosted by Diane Ducharme, Ben Chapman, Chris Gunter, Justin Moore, Audrey Kreske and Chip Simmons of the Fresh Produce Safety Task Force.

Allen Foegeding named IFT editor-in-chief

picture of Dr. Allen Foegeding

Dr. Allen Foegeding, William Neal Reynolds Professor in the Department of Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences, has been named editor-in-chief of the Institute of Food Technologists’ monthly peer-reviewed publications.

N.C. State develops mobile hand-washing stations to help farmers reduce food safety risks

Gary Roberson and Rod Gurganus

As food safety issues continue to garner national attention, N.C. State University is helping farmers in North Carolina take steps to manage food safety risks. N.C. State has developed two portable hand-washing station prototypes as customizable models for local growers in an effort to help them provide quality hand-washing facilities in their fields and at their market stalls.

Foundations for Intervention

Dr. Sophia Kathariou and colleagues

Each year, foodborne microbes make millions sick, lead to hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations and kill more than 3,000 people in the United States alone. In her Schaub Hall laboratory, N.C. State University’s Dr. Sophia Kathariou works to reduce that toll by unraveling the molecular mysteries of two particularly problematic pathogens.

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