Posts Tagged ‘inflation’

YOU DECIDE: Should you celebrate the Fed’s birthday?

Dr. Michael Walden is William Neal Reynolds professor of agricultural and resource economics at N.C. State University.

Should we celebrate of condemn the Federal Reserve? N.C. State University economist Mike Walden discusses the often controversial federal agency.

YOU DECIDE: Does the cost-of-living vary by where you live?

Dr. Michael Walden is William Neal Reynolds professor of agricultural and resource economics at N.C. State University.

There are no official cost-of-living rates for states and most localities, but there are ways to determine cost-of-living. N.C. State University economist Mike Walden explains.

YOU DECIDE: Can inflation be too low?

Dr. Michael Walden is William Neal Reynolds professor of agricultural and resource economics at N.C. State University.

We usually worry about rapidly rising prices when we think about inflation. But N.C. State University economist explains that inflation can also be a problem if it’s too low.

YOU DECIDE: How would you grade the Fed?

Dr. Michael Walden is William Neal Reynolds professor of agricultural and resource economics at N.C. State University.

The Federal Reserve has been front and center when in comes to both policies and debates related to the economy in recent years. But what exactly is the Federal Reserve, what does it do and what impacts can it have? Mike Walden discusses.

YOU DECIDE: Can we agree on the economy?

Dr. Michael Walden is William Neal Reynolds professor of agricultural and resource economics at N.C. State University.

In an election year, it seems there’s very little on which we can agree. But Mike Walden says there is substantial agreement among policy makers about what’s needed to make the economy function more smoothly.

YOU DECIDE: Can economics predict presidential elections?

Dr. Michael Walden is William Neal Reynolds professor of agricultural and resource economics at N.C. State University.

The nation’s economic condition plays a role in presidential elections, but can economics predict the outcome of presidential elections? Mike Walden discusses.

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