Posts Tagged ‘Plants for Human Health Institute’

N.C. State scientists create food ingredient to combat peanut allergies

Dr. Mary Ann Lila

A team of scientists from the Plants for Human Health Institute has developed a food ingredient from peanut flour and cranberry extracts, among other plants, that has the potential to lessen the life-threatening allergic reactions brought on by peanut consumption.

Study shows blueberries reduce risk of Parkinson’s

Lila holds juice and blueberries.

A recent study has shown that consumption of blueberries, long considered a “super food,” may protect human brain performance and reduce the risk of contracting Parkinson’s disease. In the United States, it is estimated that one million people suffer from Parkinson’s, which is the 14th leading cause of death in the country, according to the National Parkinson Foundation.

Program awards funding to expand agricultural businesses

The North Carolina Value-Added Cost Share (NCVACS) program and the N.C. Tobacco Trust Fund Commission (NCTTFC) this week announced the recipients of 2013 equipment cost share awards. Coordinated by N.C. Cooperative Extension, NCVACS awarded $311,938 to 20 agricultural operations across the state.

PHHI Extension partnership lands $425,000 in grants

The North Carolina Cooperative Extension component of N.C. State University’s Plants for Human Health Institute (PHHI), in partnership with the university’s Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, has secured more than $400,000 in funding through two major grant programs to assist the state’s growers and agricultural operations in 2013.

Strawberry breeding program receives national grants

Strawberries in field

Dr. Jeremy Pattison, strawberry breeder and geneticist with the N.C. State University Plants for Human Health Institute at the N.C. Research Campus, is working on two grant-funded projects to support work in transferring the latest research to strawberry growers in North and South Carolina and Virginia to maximize yields and profitability.

Day five on the Dean’s tour: Kannapolis, Charlotte and Winston-Salem

Lynne Safrit (right) shows Dean Richard Linton the Plants for Human Health Institute on the North Carolina Research Campus.

On the fifth leg of his statewide tour, Dean Richard Linton visited the North Carolina Research Campus in Kannapolis and had meetings in Charlotte and Winston-Salem.

N.C. State gets new plant scientist, expands at N.C. Research Campus

Tsung-Fu Hsieh

N.C. State University’s Plants for Human Health Institute continues its expansion efforts by adding another established scientist to its team at the N.C. Research Campus in Kannapolis. Dr. Tzung-Fu Hsieh (pronounced: “Zung Foo Shay”) joined the institute in August 2012 and is developing a research program centered on the biological systems of flowering plants, including fruits and vegetables. With the addition of Hsieh, N.C. State now employs nearly 50 faculty and staff in Kannapolis.

N.C. State develops mobile hand-washing stations to help farmers reduce food safety risks

Gary Roberson and Rod Gurganus

As food safety issues continue to garner national attention, N.C. State University is helping farmers in North Carolina take steps to manage food safety risks. N.C. State has developed two portable hand-washing station prototypes as customizable models for local growers in an effort to help them provide quality hand-washing facilities in their fields and at their market stalls.

Scientists lay groundwork for cabbage breeding program

Fresh cabbage at the State Farmers Market in Raleigh, N.C.

KANNAPOLIS, NC – Two scientists with the N.C. State University Plants for Human Health Institute at the N.C. Research Campus in Kannapolis are studying more than 300 cabbage varieties as part of the initial phase in a cabbage breeding program.

N.C. State helps agribusinesses gain $1.2 million in USDA grants

Chapel Hill Creamery wins USDA grant

N.C. State University’s North Carolina Value-Added Cost Share (NCVACS) program provided more than $100,000 in matching funds to help N.C. agricultural producers apply for and secure nearly $1.2 million in U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) grants. The USDA last week announced the recipients of its Value-Added Producer Grant (VAPG), eight of which are N.C. businesses that were assisted by NCVACS.

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