Posts Tagged ‘research’

Steward of the Future: Rodolphe Barrangou

Rodolphe Barrangou

A DNA cutting technology has changed the world of genetic studies, advancing food and agriculture, biotechnology and medical industries. In this short video, Dr. Rodolphe Barrangou discusses the CRISPR technology used in his lab in the Department of Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences.

Making a Difference: Food production

The world population is projected to reach 9.5 billion by 2050. Between now and then, we will need to produce more food than we have in the previous 10,000 years. College of Agriculture and Life Sciences faculty members are hard at work examining the critical questions and developing innovative solutions to the grand challenge of feeding the world.

Improving the cassava plant

Linda Hanley-Bowdoin

Cassava is Africa’s number two crop and a major source of calories for 700 million people, but it’s highly susceptible to pathogens such as cassava mosaic disease. With African colleagues and students, Dr. Linda Hanley-Bowdoin of NC State University’s College of Agriculture conducts basic research aimed at gaining a better basic molecular-level understanding of viruses and how they affect cassava.

Steward of the Future: David Tarpy

David Tarpy

“If it weren’t for honeybees and other pollinators, we wouldn’t have about a third of everything that we eat,” explains Dr. David Tarpy, a North Carolina State University entomologist. In this video, he explains his research on the genomics of honeybee queen development and their reproductive potential. It’s research with important implications for the future of food production.

Mapping human disease: ‘Not all pathogens are everywhere’

Maps reflect vectored human diseases (top) and non-vectored human diseases.

Researchers at North Carolina State University have for the first time mapped human disease-causing pathogens, dividing the world into a number of regions where similar diseases occur. The findings show that the world can be separated into seven regions for vectored human diseases – diseases that are spread by pests, like mosquito-borne malaria – and five regions for non-vectored diseases, like cholera.

Two days in the life: Dean Richard Linton’s 2014 state bus tour

CALS Dean Richard Linton (left) and Dr. Todd See, head of the Department of Animal Science, listen to their tour guide at N.C. A&T State University's field lab.

In this second annual bus tour, Linton and his department heads led a two-day exploration of North Carolina’s piedmont region.

Changing nighttime temperatures present new crop production challenge

Rice field

As nighttime temperatures rise faster than daytime temperatures, agricultural production faces a new challenge being explored by NC State University’s Dr. Colleen Doherty. Doherty, an assistant professor of Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, studies how plants perceive and respond to changing temperatures and other stressors that keep them from attaining optimal yields.

NIFA chief delivers wide-sweeping seminar on challenges facing 21st century agriculture

Dr. Sonny Ramaswamy spoke at a agbiotechnology summit before deliving a Cooperative Extension seminar at NC State University.

Calling a booming world population “the mother of all wicked problems,” National Institute of Food and Agriculture Director Sonny Ramaswamy called upon an NC State University audience to press forward in their attempts to deliver on the promise of biophysical and social sciences in ensuring food security for a population expected to reach 9 billion by 2050.

Warmer temps limit parasites’ impact, boost pest populations

Metaphycus wasp

Climate change is expected to disrupt ecosystems by changing insects’ and other organisms’ life cycles in unpredictable ways -– and scientists are getting a preview of these changes in cities. NC State University research shows that some insect pests are thriving in warm, urban environments and developing earlier, limiting the impact of parasitoid wasps that normally help keep those pest populations in check.

CEFS receives $2.5 million in new grants

Cows

Researchers at the Center for Environmental Farming Systems have received three grants totaling more than $2.5 million since July to support research and education at the center’s 2,000-acre research farm in Goldsboro and on farms across the state.

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