Posts Tagged ‘research’

Reunion, Soilbration bring alumni, friends back to CEFS

Paul Mueller, Susan Perry-Cole, Roger Crickenberger, Shorlette Ammons and Alex Hitt

What do Firsthand Foods CEO Jennifer Curtis, University of Georgia faculty member Suzanne O’Connell and Western Illinois University Organic Research Director Joel Gruver have in common? All developed a passion for what they do now through earlier work with the Center for Environmental Farming Systems.

College Profile: José Alonso

Dr. José Alonso

Dr. José Alonso’s groundbreaking explorations in plant biology land him on a list of the world’s most influential scientists.

CALS alumnus receives Emerging Scholar Award from American Society of Animal Science

Dr. David Rosero (right) accepts the Southern Section Emerging Scholar Award from Dr. Lawton Stewart, University of Georgia.

Dr. David Rosero hopes to make significant and relevant contributions to the field of animal science.

Avid apiculture students, master beekeepers are among late professor’s legacies

Dr. John Ambrose with student

Dr. John Thomas Ambrose — a popular College of Agriculture and Life Sciences professor, NC State University administrator and bee authority – passed away in January after a short battle with brain cancer. He was 70.

Collins, Edmisten win national cotton awards

Guy Collins (left) and Keith Edmisten

NC State University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences faculty members won two of the top awards given last week at the national Beltwide Cotton Conferences in San Antonio, Texas.

Steward of the Future: Rodolphe Barrangou

Rodolphe Barrangou

A DNA cutting technology has changed the world of genetic studies, advancing food and agriculture, biotechnology and medical industries. In this short video, Dr. Rodolphe Barrangou discusses the CRISPR technology used in his lab in the Department of Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences.

Making a Difference: Food production

The world population is projected to reach 9.5 billion by 2050. Between now and then, we will need to produce more food than we have in the previous 10,000 years. College of Agriculture and Life Sciences faculty members are hard at work examining the critical questions and developing innovative solutions to the grand challenge of feeding the world.

Improving the cassava plant

Linda Hanley-Bowdoin

Cassava is Africa’s number two crop and a major source of calories for 700 million people, but it’s highly susceptible to pathogens such as cassava mosaic disease. With African colleagues and students, Dr. Linda Hanley-Bowdoin of NC State University’s College of Agriculture conducts basic research aimed at gaining a better basic molecular-level understanding of viruses and how they affect cassava.

Steward of the Future: David Tarpy

David Tarpy

“If it weren’t for honeybees and other pollinators, we wouldn’t have about a third of everything that we eat,” explains Dr. David Tarpy, a North Carolina State University entomologist. In this video, he explains his research on the genomics of honeybee queen development and their reproductive potential. It’s research with important implications for the future of food production.

Mapping human disease: ‘Not all pathogens are everywhere’

Maps reflect vectored human diseases (top) and non-vectored human diseases.

Researchers at North Carolina State University have for the first time mapped human disease-causing pathogens, dividing the world into a number of regions where similar diseases occur. The findings show that the world can be separated into seven regions for vectored human diseases – diseases that are spread by pests, like mosquito-borne malaria – and five regions for non-vectored diseases, like cholera.

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