Posts Tagged ‘research’

2013-2014 CALS Distinguished Alumni, Outstanding Alumni honored

Dr. E. Carroll Joyner stands next to a display honoring his and Dr. Ram Badan Singh's selection as CALS Distinguished Alumni.

The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences has announced Dr. Edward Carroll Joyner and Dr. Ram Badan Singh as its 2013-2014 Distinguished Alumni.

PHHI researchers featured on WUNC-TV science show Sept. 25

Mary Ann Lila

Two researchers from N.C. State University’s Plants for Human Health Institute (PHHI) — Dr. Mary Ann Lila and Dr. Allen Brown — will be featured on UNC-TV’s N.C. Science Now show on Wednesday Sept. 25 at 7:30 p.m.

Steve Lommel named to lead CALS research

Picture of Dr. Steve Lommel.

Dr. Steven Lommel has been named associate dean and director for the N.C. Agricultural Research Service in N.C. State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, effective Sept. 1.

CALS enters new research partnership with multinational animal health company

Sergio Gamio, Mike Williams, Antonio Armejo, Richard Linton, Peter Ferket and William Serna.

As agribusiness professionals from Latin America gathered in Raleigh in early August for the first Symposium on Emerging Issues in Poultry Nutrition and Meat Production, N.C. State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences officially entered a groundbreaking research partnership with a multinational animal health company.

CALS scientist honored as emerging scholar

conducting research to prevent and manage porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome. The viral syndrome costs the U.S. pork industry millions each year.

Dr. Julie Hicks, a postdoctoral scholar and recent Ph.D. degree recipient from N.C. State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, recently won a top regional award for her research into the molecular-level processes involved in one of the world’s most important swine diseases.

Graduate student’s discovery can enable tick population management

Ann Carr's tick attractant research was featured earlier this year in the journal Medical and Veterinary Entomology.

Doctoral student Ann Carr is hard at work developing ways to attract ticks so that the general population can avoid them.
Under the direction of Department of Entomology professors Dr. Charles Apperson, Dr. Michael Roe and Dr. Coby Schal, Carr recently discovered that two chemicals – acetone and ammonium hydroxide – attract high numbers of the tick species Amblyomma americanum. The development of this chemical cocktail could open new doors for the screening and management of tick populations in North Carolina and beyond.

Relevant Research

Miranda Ganci, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences graduate student in plant pathology, has a clear vision of her future career. “I see myself working as an extension agent in order to assist growers with disease identification and management,” she says. “Additionally, I am interested in working in the crop protection industry in a role in which I could assist plant breeders with developing disease resistance in crops.” She’s already playing that role. Ganci, who is from Hickory and expects to receive her N.C. State University master’s degree in 2014, is studying ways to design mitigation strategies against box blight, an aggressive disease that threatens the economic viability of the boxwood industry.

CALS graduate students address important issues and blaze paths to future careers with their GSRS research projects.

Stopping aggressive boxwood blight

Miranda Ganci is researching management strategies for boxwood blight, an agressive disease that threatens the economic viability of the boxwood industry.

Miranda Ganci has a clear vision of her future career. “I see myself working as an extension agent in order to assist growers with disease identification and management,” she says. “Additionally, I am interested in working in the crop protection industry in a role in which I could assist plant breeders with developing disease resistance in crops.” She’s already playing that role.

Making the methane conversion process value-added and eco-friendly

Gourishankar Karoshi is exploring how to use eggshells as a catalyst to lessen the amount of energy it takes to turn methane into transportation fuel and other chemical products.

Gourishankar Karoshi, a master’s degree student in biological and agricultural engineering, is exploring a process that takes an abundant greenhouse gas and an abundant agricultural waste product and potentially yields value-added and eco-friendly results.

Strategy to inhibit ovarian cancer in hens could benefit human health

"Effective chemoprevention and risk reduction are the first defenses" against lethal ovarian cancer, says Elizabeth Harris, whose genetic research is designed to reduce ovarian cancer in hens and yield important implications for cancer prevention in humans.

Elizabeth Harris, a physiology student, has developed a strategy that could inhibit the start and progression of ovarian cancer in hens and have important implications for preventing cancer in people.

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