Posts Tagged ‘research’

One size doesn’t fit all

A single global model can’t predict savanna tree density as well as continent-specific models, according to research published in Science this week. Photo of a South African savanna courtesy of Dr. William Hoffmann, a co-author of the study.

A general cross-continent model to predict the effects of climate change on savanna vegetation isn’t as effective as examining individual savannas by continent, according to research published in Science this week.

Savannas – grasslands dotted with trees – cover about 20 percent of the earth’s land and play a critical role in storing atmospheric carbon, says Dr. William Hoffmann, associate professor of plant and microbial biology at North Carolina State University and co-author of the study. “We wanted to find out what controls savanna vegetation – essentially the density of trees within the savanna – and whether we can use a single global model to predict what will happen to savannas if global temperatures rise,” Hoffmann said.

CALS is part of award-winning research project

picture of sweet potatoes

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences faculty members play a major role in a multistate research project that focuses on sweet potatoes.

Horticultural scientist explores tomato flavor

N.C. State University scientist Dilip Panthee and colleagues are studying the tomato's genetic diversity to help breeders develop grocery-store varieties that yield garden-fresh flavor.

Consumers value garden-fresh flavor when it comes to tomatoes, but such flavor isn’t always available on grocery store shelves year-round. Recently published research from N.C. State University scientist Dilip Panthee and colleagues aims to change that.

2013-2014 CALS Distinguished Alumni, Outstanding Alumni honored

Dr. E. Carroll Joyner stands next to a display honoring his and Dr. Ram Badan Singh's selection as CALS Distinguished Alumni.

The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences has announced Dr. Edward Carroll Joyner and Dr. Ram Badan Singh as its 2013-2014 Distinguished Alumni.

PHHI researchers featured on WUNC-TV science show Sept. 25

Mary Ann Lila

Two researchers from N.C. State University’s Plants for Human Health Institute (PHHI) — Dr. Mary Ann Lila and Dr. Allen Brown — will be featured on UNC-TV’s N.C. Science Now show on Wednesday Sept. 25 at 7:30 p.m.

Steve Lommel named to lead CALS research

Picture of Dr. Steve Lommel.

Dr. Steven Lommel has been named associate dean and director for the N.C. Agricultural Research Service in N.C. State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, effective Sept. 1.

CALS enters new research partnership with multinational animal health company

Sergio Gamio, Mike Williams, Antonio Armejo, Richard Linton, Peter Ferket and William Serna.

As agribusiness professionals from Latin America gathered in Raleigh in early August for the first Symposium on Emerging Issues in Poultry Nutrition and Meat Production, N.C. State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences officially entered a groundbreaking research partnership with a multinational animal health company.

CALS scientist honored as emerging scholar

conducting research to prevent and manage porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome. The viral syndrome costs the U.S. pork industry millions each year.

Dr. Julie Hicks, a postdoctoral scholar and recent Ph.D. degree recipient from N.C. State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, recently won a top regional award for her research into the molecular-level processes involved in one of the world’s most important swine diseases.

Graduate student’s discovery can enable tick population management

Ann Carr's tick attractant research was featured earlier this year in the journal Medical and Veterinary Entomology.

Doctoral student Ann Carr is hard at work developing ways to attract ticks so that the general population can avoid them.
Under the direction of Department of Entomology professors Dr. Charles Apperson, Dr. Michael Roe and Dr. Coby Schal, Carr recently discovered that two chemicals – acetone and ammonium hydroxide – attract high numbers of the tick species Amblyomma americanum. The development of this chemical cocktail could open new doors for the screening and management of tick populations in North Carolina and beyond.

Relevant Research

Miranda Ganci, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences graduate student in plant pathology, has a clear vision of her future career. “I see myself working as an extension agent in order to assist growers with disease identification and management,” she says. “Additionally, I am interested in working in the crop protection industry in a role in which I could assist plant breeders with developing disease resistance in crops.” She’s already playing that role. Ganci, who is from Hickory and expects to receive her N.C. State University master’s degree in 2014, is studying ways to design mitigation strategies against box blight, an aggressive disease that threatens the economic viability of the boxwood industry.

CALS graduate students address important issues and blaze paths to future careers with their GSRS research projects.

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