Posts Tagged ‘research’

Making the methane conversion process value-added and eco-friendly

Gourishankar Karoshi is exploring how to use eggshells as a catalyst to lessen the amount of energy it takes to turn methane into transportation fuel and other chemical products.

Gourishankar Karoshi, a master’s degree student in biological and agricultural engineering, is exploring a process that takes an abundant greenhouse gas and an abundant agricultural waste product and potentially yields value-added and eco-friendly results.

Strategy to inhibit ovarian cancer in hens could benefit human health

"Effective chemoprevention and risk reduction are the first defenses" against lethal ovarian cancer, says Elizabeth Harris, whose genetic research is designed to reduce ovarian cancer in hens and yield important implications for cancer prevention in humans.

Elizabeth Harris, a physiology student, has developed a strategy that could inhibit the start and progression of ovarian cancer in hens and have important implications for preventing cancer in people.

Pinehurst No. 2 goes native

Ph.D. student Kevin Stallings is among the N.C. State crop scientists and turf specialists who are developing sustainable strategies for golf courses.

Kevin Stallings, a Ph.D. student in crop science, is conducting research that could be used in the restoration of a storied golf course that will host the 2014 U.S. Open. Stallings is characterizing native vegetation, desirable adapted species and invasive weeds at Pinehurst No. 2, all in an effort to create a model for how course superintendents can approach sustainability.

Research Campus launches effort to engage students in science

student at computer

An unprecedented partnership of academic and industry organizations at the North Carolina Research Campus has launched a groundbreaking $1.5 million program to engage college students from across the state in a first-of-its-kind education and research endeavor. Called the Plant Pathways Elucidation Project (P2EP), the program teams up university scientists, industry leaders and college students to explore how fruits and vegetables benefit human health.

Strawberry breeding program receives national grants

Strawberries in field

Dr. Jeremy Pattison, strawberry breeder and geneticist with the N.C. State University Plants for Human Health Institute at the N.C. Research Campus, is working on two grant-funded projects to support work in transferring the latest research to strawberry growers in North and South Carolina and Virginia to maximize yields and profitability.

PHHI researchers enhance combat rations with fruits, vegetables

Picture of Mary Ann Lila

North Carolina State University is working with the U.S. Army to create functional food ingredients from fruits and vegetables that will be used to develop healthier, more portable combat rations for soldiers.

Bittersweet: Bait-averse cockroaches shudder at sugar

Sugar isn’t always sweet to German cockroaches, especially to the ones that avoid roach baits. In a study published May 24 in the journal Science, North Carolina State University entomologists show the neural mechanism behind the aversion to glucose, the simple sugar that is a popular ingredient in roach-bait poison.

Climate center names 2013-14 Global Change Fellows

Seven N.C. State University graduate students, including one from the College of Agriculture and Life Science have been named Global Change Fellows for 2013-14 by the SE Climate Science Center, based in CALS.

Seymour: Preserve forests in the name of food security

Frances Seymour

Preserving international forests, providing food security and addressing issues of global climate change will require a coordinated effort, Frances Seymour told an audience at N.C. State University for the 2013 Borlaug Lecture.

PHHI seeks broccoli with enhanced lutein

Allen Brown with broccoli

KANNAPOLIS – A new N.C. State University study under way at the Plants for Human Health Institute at the N.C. Research Campus is focused on enhancing levels of lutein in broccoli. Lutein, an antioxidant, is associated with lowering risks for cataracts and age-related macular degeneration and is also found in leafy greens such as kale and spinach.

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