Posts Tagged ‘students’

CALS donors and retirees celebrated at December reception

William D. Toussaint Agricultural and Resource Economics Scholar Evan Chappell (right) of Candor sits with scholarship donor Eunice Toussaint at the Dec. 8 reception.

The Retiree and Donor Appreciation Event, celebrating the contributions of donors and retirees to the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, this year included an opportunity for the guests of honor to participate in a special Cooperative Extension Visioning Initiative.

Faculty, students honored at joint society meetings

Dr. Charles W. Stuber

Two College of Agriculture and Life Sciences faculty members were among award winners while three CALS students were scholarship winners at the joint annual meetings of the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America and Soil Science Society of America.

New scholarship honors J.C. Whitehurst Jr., visionary agribusinessman

Participating in the ceremony to establish the annual scholarship are (seated from left) Jim Whitehurst and Tony Griffin; (standing) Dean Richard Linton, Ann Whitehurst, Helen Kirven and Sam Pardue.

The late J.C. Whitehurst Jr. of Greenville was honored Nov. 1 with the creation of an annual scholarship in his name by Coastal AgroBusiness Inc., the company he founded.

Hello Cherry Brick Road

CALS Dean Richard Linton and student Eanas Alia serve up Cherry Brick Road ice cream.

Dean Richard Linton played host to hundreds of students and staff members who lined up to try the dean’s signature flavor of Howling Cow ice cream and hear the announcement of its name.

CALS students work with AgrAbility to help create ‘hallelujah moments’

Students from the CALS Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering have partnered with N.C. AgrAbility in creating a solar-powered hydraulic water delivery system to assist a Macon County farmer.

Pam Martin’s organic vegetable farm is her livelihood. But a respiratory disease and diabetes make it difficult for the Macon County farmer to work for longer than 15 minutes at a time. One of her biggest struggles? Dragging a hose 50 to 100 yards from her house to water the garden and nourish her chickens and horses. Enter the North Carolina AgrAbility Partnership.

Mark your calendars for the next CALS Career Expo on Feb. 11, 2014

CALS student discusses careers with a potential employer at the 2012 Career Expo.

The Expo showcases full-time jobs, internships and volunteer opportunities, but it is also a chance to educate students about organizations and opportunities that may be available in the future.

Relevant Research

Miranda Ganci, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences graduate student in plant pathology, has a clear vision of her future career. “I see myself working as an extension agent in order to assist growers with disease identification and management,” she says. “Additionally, I am interested in working in the crop protection industry in a role in which I could assist plant breeders with developing disease resistance in crops.” She’s already playing that role. Ganci, who is from Hickory and expects to receive her N.C. State University master’s degree in 2014, is studying ways to design mitigation strategies against box blight, an aggressive disease that threatens the economic viability of the boxwood industry.

CALS graduate students address important issues and blaze paths to future careers with their GSRS research projects.

Stopping aggressive boxwood blight

Miranda Ganci is researching management strategies for boxwood blight, an agressive disease that threatens the economic viability of the boxwood industry.

Miranda Ganci has a clear vision of her future career. “I see myself working as an extension agent in order to assist growers with disease identification and management,” she says. “Additionally, I am interested in working in the crop protection industry in a role in which I could assist plant breeders with developing disease resistance in crops.” She’s already playing that role.

Making the methane conversion process value-added and eco-friendly

Gourishankar Karoshi is exploring how to use eggshells as a catalyst to lessen the amount of energy it takes to turn methane into transportation fuel and other chemical products.

Gourishankar Karoshi, a master’s degree student in biological and agricultural engineering, is exploring a process that takes an abundant greenhouse gas and an abundant agricultural waste product and potentially yields value-added and eco-friendly results.

Strategy to inhibit ovarian cancer in hens could benefit human health

"Effective chemoprevention and risk reduction are the first defenses" against lethal ovarian cancer, says Elizabeth Harris, whose genetic research is designed to reduce ovarian cancer in hens and yield important implications for cancer prevention in humans.

Elizabeth Harris, a physiology student, has developed a strategy that could inhibit the start and progression of ovarian cancer in hens and have important implications for preventing cancer in people.

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