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College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
Department of Plant Pathology
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PP318 - Web Links to Further Information

General

 

Specific diseases / Jump to:

 Abiotic Disorders and Injury  Annosum Root Rot  Anthracnoses  Armillaria Root Rot
 Beech Scale Nectria Canker  Canker Diseases  Chestnut Blight  Comandra Blister Rust
 Dogwood Anthracnose  Dutch Elm Disease  Foliage Diseases of Conifers  Fusiform Rust
 Gymnosporangium Rusts  Leaf Blister & Leaf Spots  Littleleaf Disease  Mycorrhizae
 Oak Wilt  Oomycota  Parasitic Higher Plants  Phytophthora Root Rot
 Pine Needle Rust  Pine-Oak Gall Rust  Pitch Canker  Powdery Mildew
 Seed, Nursery, and Seedling Diseases  Southern Cone Rust  Symptoms and Signs of Plant Disease  White Pine Blister Rust
 Wood Decay      

 


Phytophthora Root Rot

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/pp/notes/oldnotes/od13.htm
    Summary: Phytophthora root rot is a serious, widespread, and difficult-to-control fungal disease that affects a wide range of
    plants in North Carolina.  Plants susceptible to root rot caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi include azalea, rhododendron,
    dogwood, Camellia japonica , Pieris, Taxus (yew), deodar cedar, mountain laurel, heather, juniper, high-bush blueberries,
    Fraser fir, white pine, shortleaf pine, leucothoe, aucuba, and others.  Phytophthora root rot is favored by high soil moisture
    and warm soil temperatures. It must be prevented, because chemicals often are ineffective in controlling this disease after
    above-ground symptoms become obvious.

http://www.apsnet.org/education/feature/1225tree/
    Summary:  This website from the American Phytopathological Society entitled "The Christmas Tree:  Traditions, Production,
    and Diseases" provides an in-depth discussion of the history of the Christmas tree industry and what it is like today.  It also
    discusses various diseases that affect the industry such as phytophthora root rot, current season needle necrosis, and
    interior needle blight syndrome.  The site ends with a statement about the future of the Christmas tree industry and a list of
    references.

Return to Phytophthora Root Rot disease profile


Anthracnoses (see also: Dogwood Anthracnose)

http://www2.ncsu.edu:80/unity/lockers/project/pestmngt4/srurban/CHAP4/OPM/chap4.htm
    Summary:  This page from Oklahoma State University is a whole chapter providing information on the types of plant
    pathogens, diagnosing plant diseases, and different techniques for managing plant diseases.  Perhaps the most helpful is
    the descriptions and illustrations of numerous diseases, including foliage diseases such as anthracnoses, leaf spots, and
    powdery mildews.

Return to anthracnose disease profile


Leaf Blister & Leaf Spots (incl. Tar Spot)

http://www3.extension.umn.edu/projects/yardandgarden/ygbriefs/p414anthracnosemaple.html
    Summary:  This page from the University of Minnesota provides a picture and a brief description of anthracnose, Phyllosticta
    leaf spot, and tar spot.  It also discusses favorable conditions for infection and different measures of control.

http://www.exnet.iastate.edu./pages/plantpath/oaklb.html
    Summary:   This site provides a brief description of leaf blister on oak, along with 2 pictures.

Return to leaf spot, leaf blister, tar spot disease profile


Powdery Mildew

http://ianrwww.unl.edu/pubs/plantdisease/g1321.htm
    Summary: This site provides information on the signs and symptoms of powdery mildew, a list of common susceptible
    species, control measures, and a listing of fungicides often used for treatment.

http://courses.ncsu.edu/pp318/lec/001/wrap/profiles/pm/pm.html
    This page was developed by a Forest Pathology student to illustrate the various powdery mildew fungi commonly found in North Carolina.
Return to powdery mildew disease profile


Fusiform Rust

http://www.forestpests.org/subject.html?SUB=730
    Summary:  This site from the USDA Forest Service gives a brief overview of the importance of fusiform rust, identifying the
    fungus, and the life cycle.  It gives a reference for learning about control measures.  The page also includes two pictures
    that enlarge to view in greater detail.

http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/fidls/fusiform/fidl-fusi.htm
    Summary:  This site from the USDA Forest Service, entitled "Fusiform Rust of Southern Pines", goes into more detail.  It
    discusses topics such as hosts, distribution, life cycle, and control.  It provides diagrams and pictures to go along with the
    topics of distribution and life cycle.

http://www.sfrc.ufl.edu/Extension/bul903.htm
    Summary:  This site from the University of Florida has links at the top of the page for 32 topics that it covers below regarding
    fusiform rust on southern pines.  It covers the history of the disease, the life cycle, susceptible species, critical factors for
    disease, management, and many more areas.  It contains 9 figures in all, including charts, diagrams, and pictures.

Return to Fusiform Rust disease profile


Annosum Root Rot

http://www.forestpests.org/subject.html?SUB=519
    Summary:  This site discusses the importance, symptoms and signs, life cycle, ecological importance, management
    strategies, and spread of Annosum Root Rot.  It contains 3 pictures and a diagram of hazard areas.

http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/course/pp728/heterobasidion/heterobasidion_annosum.html
    Summary:  A profile developed by a student in PP728 "Soilborne Plant Pathogens".

Return to Annosum Root Rot disease profile


Armillaria Root Rot

http://www.ipm.uiuc.edu/diseases/series600/rpd602/index.html
    Summary:  This page from the University of Illinois gives a general overview of Armillaria
    (Shoestring) Root Rot, including control measures and an extensive host list.

http://www3.extension.umn.edu/projects/yardandgarden/ygbriefs/p415armillaria.html
    Summary:  This page from the University of Minnesota Extension Service describes the signs and symptoms of Armillaria
    Root Rot, conditions favorable for infection, and control strategies.  It includes two pictures that enlarge to view in greater
    detail.

Return to Armillaria Root Rot disease profile


Dutch Elm Disease

http://www.fs.fed.us/na/morgantown/fhp/palerts/ded/elm.htm
    Summary:  This site from the United States Department of Agriculture provides an in-depth look at Dutch Elm Disease.  It
    covers foliage and vascular symptoms, ways to distinguish the disease from other problems, disease cycle, spread, various
    methods of control, and how to decide which method to use.  It contains some great pictures, including a large, detailed color
    picture of the disease cycle.

http://www.ext.colostate.edu/ptlk/1423.html
    Summary:  This page also has some good information on Dutch Elm Disease.  It starts by giving some quick facts,
    and then discusses disease transmission by root grafts and beetles, many different methods of control that can be used, and
    resistant varieties.

http://www.oznet.ksu.edu/dp_hfrr/extensn/problems/dtchelm.htm
    Summary:  This site from Kansas State University starts by giving a description of the fungus, Ophiostoma ulmi.  It also gives
    information on the symptoms of the disease, pathogen-insect vector relationships, and various recommendations for control.

Return to Dutch Elm Disease disease profile


Oak Wilt

http://www.forestpests.org/subject.html?SUB=642
    Summary:  This site from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service contains some good information on oak wilt,
    caused by Ceratocystis fagacearum.  It discusses distribution in the United States, hosts, symptoms on different hosts,
    and control practices.

http://www.forestpests.org/southern/Diseases/oakwilt.htm
    Summary:  This site from the USDA Forest Service gives a brief overview of the importance of oak wilt, identifying the fungus,
    identifying the injury, biology, and control.

Return to Oak Wilt disease profile


Beech Scale Nectria Canker

http://www.forestpests.org/subject.html?SUB=550 
    Summary:  This site from the Department of Agriculture Forest Service covers topics such as history and distribution, disease
    pattern, the causal complex, symptoms and course of the disease, associated organisms, and control.  It also includes 12
    pictures illustrating the text.

Return to Beech Scale Nectria Canker disease profile


Chestnut Blight

http://www.forestpests.org/southern/Diseases/chsntblt.htm
    Summary:  This site from the United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service gives a brief overview of chestnut blight,
    caused by Cryphonectria (Endothia) parasitica.  Topics covered include importance, identifying the fungus, identifying the
    injury, biology, and control.

http://www.ppws.vt.edu/griffin/accf.html
    Summary:  This is the American Chestnut Cooperators Foundation web page that is full of information both on the history of Chestnut Blight and hopeful notes regarding efforts to restore American chestnut to eastern forests through use of hypovirulent strains of the fungus, rootstock grafting and other forestry practices.

Return to Chestnut Blight disease profile


Pitch Canker

http://www.forestpests.org/subject.html?SUB=559
    Summary:  This site about pitch canker is from the USDA Forest Service.  Topics covered include importance, identifying
    the fungus, identifying the injury, biology, and control.

Return to Pitch Canker disease profile


Foliage Diseases of Conifers

BROWN SPOT DISEASE

http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/fidls/br%5Fspot%5Fpines/brown%2Dspot.htm
    Summary:  US Forest Service disease note on Brown Spot.

Return to Brown Spot disease profile

LOPHODERMIUM NEEDLE CAST

http://www.forestpests.org/nursery/lophodermium.html
    Summary:  University of Georgia's information sheet on Lophodermium. Includes both the biology of the pathogen and its control.

http://www.agcom.purdue.edu/AgCom/Pubs/BP/BP-52.html
    Summary:  This page from Purdue University is about Lophodermium Needle Cast.  It gives a pretty good description of the
    causes of the disease, the symptoms, and management techniques.

Return to Lophodermium Needle Cast disease profile

DOTHISTROMA NEEDLE BLIGHT

http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/fidls/dothistroma/doth.htm
    Summary:  Forest Service's Dothistroma Needle Blight disease pamphlet.

http://www.oznet.ksu.edu/dp_hfrr/extensn/problems/dothist.htm
    Summary:  This site from Kansas State University gives an overview of Dothistroma Needle Blight, caused by Mycosphaerella
    pini.  It describes the symptoms and signs, the causes of the disease, and it ends with recommendations for control.

Return to Dothistroma Needle Blight disease profile

SOOTY MOLD

http://www3.extension.umn.edu/projects/yardandgarden/ygbriefs/p440sootymold.html
    Summary:  This page from the University of Minnesota gives a brief overview of sooty mold.  It discusses symptoms,
    common hosts, and control.  There is also one picture that you can enlarge to see in more detail.

Return to Sooty Mold on Pine disease profile

Return to Sooty Mold general profile


Mycorrhizae

http://www.ffp.csiro.au/research/mycorrhiza/vam.html
    Summary:  This page from CSIRO Forestry and Forest Products in Australia contains an outline which links to various
    topics concerning mycorrhizae.  Each section provides a thorough description, along with some great diagrams and pictures.
    The page also includes a list of key terminology and links to other web sites.

http://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/mycology/
    Summary:  This page is from the Pacific Northwest Reserach station and is a general site about forest mycology and mycorrhizae. It provides numerous links to helpful resources, including mycology databases and 26 other web sites.

http://www.forestpests.org/nursery/mycorrhizae.html
    Summary:  This is a US Forest Service page titled Mycorrhizae: Benefits and Practical Application in Forest Tree Nurseries. 

Return to Mycorrhizae profile


Canker Diseases

NECTRIA CANKER

http://www3.extension.umn.edu/projects/yardandgarden/ygbriefs/p431nectria.html
    Summary:  This page from the University of Minnesota gives a brief description of nectria cankers.  It lists some common
    hosts, explains how cankers are formed, and suggests some methods to help reduce canker development.

http://www.forestpests.org/subject.html?SUB=570
    Summary:  This page from the USDA Forest Service discusses such topics as the importance of nectria canker, identifying
    the fungus, identifying the injury, biology, and control.

Return to Nectria Canker disease profile

STRUMELLA CANKER

http://www.forestpests.org/subject.html?SUB=985 
    Summary:  This page from the USDA Forest Service discusses such topics as the importance of strumella canker, identifying
    the fungus, identifying the injury, biology, and control.

Return to Strumella Canker disease profile

BLACK KNOT OF CHERRIES

http://ohioline.ag.ohio-state.edu/hyg-fact/3000/3011.html
    Summary:  This page from Ohio State University is titled "Black Knot of Plums and Cherries".  It discusses, in some detail,
    topics such as symptoms, causal organism and disease development, and control.  It also contains a diagram of the disease
    cycle of black knot.

Return to Black Knot of Cherries disease profile

BOTRYOSPHAERIA CANKER

http://www.ag.uiuc.edu/cespubs/hyg/html/200213b.html
    Summary:  This site from the University of Illinois gives a brief overview of botryosphaeria canker.  It states the common
    hosts and describes the symptoms and signs that are present.

Return to Botryosphaeria Canker disease profile


Seed, Nursery, and Seedling Diseases

DAMPING OFF

http://www.forestpests.org/nursery/dampingoff.html
    Summary:  This page gives a thorough overview of damping off.  It covers
    topics such as hosts, symptoms and damage, disease development, and disease management.  It includes a table at the
    end of environmental conditions and cultural practices affecting damping-off in container tree nurseries.  This page also
    includes 4 pictures to accompany the text.

 http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/nr/fid/widweb/wid-sdis.shtml
    Summary:  This page will direct you to links on a variety of seedling diseases found in western conifer nurseries. Again, it is geared toward growers in the west, but you will find some familiar pathogens and a number of .pdf files that contain managment recommendations.

Return to Damping Off disease profile

BLACK OR CHARCOAL ROOT ROT

http://www.agcom.purdue.edu/AgCom/Pubs/BP/BP-42.html
    Summary:  This site focuses on charcoal root rot as it applies to soybeans, but it does discuss the symptoms and signs
    involved with this disease, the disease cycle, and different measures of control.

Return to Black Root Rot disease profile

Return to Cylindrocladium Foliage Blight disease profile


Gymnosporangium Rusts

http://www.ianr.unl.edu/pubs/plantdisease/g1327.htm
    Summary:  This site goes into detail about cedar-apple rust.  It discusses the symptoms that are found on both Juniperus
    hosts and apples, and it provides an illustrated disease cycle.  Other related rusts such as hawthorn rust and quince rust are
    described briefly.  Control methods are discussed thoroughly, and tables are included with information on resistant species
    and fungicides for rust control.

http://botit.botany.wisc.edu/toms_fungi/may99.html
   Summary: Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae, the cause of cedar-apple rust, was Tom Volk's Fungus of the Month for
    May 1999.  He gives an overview of the fungus, and then goes step by step through it's life cycle.  He also describes some
    other common rusts, including white pine blister rust.

Return to Gymnosporangium disease profile


Pine-Oak Gall Rust

http://www.forestpests.org/subject.html?SUB=731
    Summary:  This page from the USDA Forest Service covers topics such as importance, identifying the fungus, identifying
    the injury, biology, and control of eastern gall rust (pine-oak gall rust).

http://www.extension.umn.edu/projects/yardandgarden/ygbriefs/P426pinegallrusts.html
    Summary:  This site from the University of Minnesota extension discusses the hosts, disease cycle, and control
    of pine-oak gall rust.

Return to Pine-Oak Gall Rust disease profile


Pine Needle Rust

http://www.extension.iastate.edu/Pages/plantpath/needle.html
    Summary:  This page from Iowa State University contains two pictures, and briefly explains the signs, disease cycle,
    and the effects of pine needle rust.

Return to Pine Needle Rust disease profile


Comandra Blister Rust

http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/fidls/comandra/comandrafidl.htm
    Summary:  This web site from the USDA Forest Service goes into great detail about Comandra Blister Rust.  It starts with a
    general overview of the disease, and then goes on to discuss range and hosts, life cycle and spread, damage, symptoms,
    factors affecting outbreaks, and control recommendations.  It contains a number of images to help illustrate the text.

Return to Comandra Blister Rust disease profile


Southern Cone Rust

http://www.forestpests.org/subject.html?SUB=849
    Summary:  This page from the USDA Forest Service discusses such topics as the importance of southern cone rust,
    identifying the fungus, identifying the injury, biology, and control.

Return to Southern Cone Rust disease profile


White Pine Blister Rust

http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/howtos/ht_wpblister/toc.htm
    Summary:  This is a copy of the Forest Service publication on how to identify and control white pine blister rust.

http://ppathw3.cals.cornell.edu/Trees/WPBRust.html
    Summary:  Cornell University's information page on white pine blister rust. Gives a general summary and disease cycle.

Return to White Pine Blister Rust disease profile


Littleleaf Disease

http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/fidls/littleleaf/fidl-ll.htm
    Summary:  This page from the USDA Forest Service starts with an introduction to littleleaf disease and it's importance.  A
    diagram of the distribution is given.  The page continues with symptoms, disease biology, hazard rating, and management
    alternatives.

Return to Littleleaf disease profile


Dogwood Anthracnose

http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/howtos/ht_dogwd/ht_dog.htm
    Summary:  This page from the Department of Agriculture also contains information on dogwood anthracnose.  It gives an
    overview of anthracnose, what the symptoms are, the history of the disease, information on it's spread in the South, and
    some essential steps to prevent/control dogwood anthracnose.  The pictures provided for each symptom allow you to click
    and view a larger image.  It ends with a pesticide precautionary statement.

http://www.ext.vt.edu/pubs/plantdiseasefs/450-611/450-611.html
    Summary:  This page from the Virginia Cooperative Extension covers four foliar diseases of dogwoods:  spot anthracnose,
    Discula anthracnose (Dogwood anthracnose), Septoria leaf spot, and powdery mildew.    Concerning Discula anthracnose,
    it discusses symptoms, cycle, cultural control, chemical control, and resistance.  Four pictures are provided to supplement
    the text.

http://www.ipm.msu.edu/CAT00_land/L05-05-00.htm#3
    Summary:  This archived page (from a 2000 on-line article) from Michigan State University Extension discusses the symptoms of
    dogwood anthracnose, such as necrotic leaf spots, cankers, and twig dieback.  It also covers effective methods of control, and names
    some common fungicides that are used for control.

http://gardening.wsu.edu/library/lpro003/lpro003.htm
    Summary:  This web site from Washington State University also discusses the symptoms and control methods for dogwood
    anthracnose.  It contains pictures of three of the most common symptoms.

Return to Dogwood Anthracnose disease profile


Wood Decay

http://courses.ncsu.edu/pp318/lec/001/wrap/campus_field_trip/fieldtrip_imagemap.htm
    Summary:  This web site was designed to aid students at North Carolina State University in finding various diseases around
    campus.  A campus map is provided with links to individual disease profiles, containing a description of the disease and
    various pictures.  For wood decay, the disease we would be most interested in is heart rot.

http://www.extension.umn.edu/projects/yardandgarden/ygbriefs/P443wooddecay.html
    Summary:  University of Minnesota's extension information page on wood decay. Very general, but a good overview.

Return to Wood Decay disease profile


Symptoms and Signs of Plant Disease

http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/focus/chlorosis.html
    Summary:  This page ,titled "Chlorosis", describes the causal agents and hosts, symptoms, and common methods of
    treatment for chlorosis.  It also has links to some other common disease topics.

http://www.caf.wvu.edu/bark/cankerdiseases.htm
    Summary:  This web site from West Virginia University provides information about canker diseases of woody angiosperms
    and gymnosperms.  Besides describing many of the common cankers, the site also covers many other topics dealing with
    cankers.

Return to Symptoms and Signs disease profile


Oomycota

http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/chromista/oomycota.html
    Summary:   This page is an introduction to the Oomycota.  It gives an overview of what oomycetes are, their structure, how
    they survive, and why they are important.  It also explains how some parasitic water molds have damaged fish and many
    crop plants.  Links to help find other information about oomycetes are provided.

http://www.apsnet.org/education/LabExercises/Oomycetes/Top.html
    Summary:   A lab exercise designed by members of the American Phytopathological Society. Before you get to the exercise, there is a lot of great  introductory information on this group of fungus-like organisms.

Return to the Oomycetes disease profile


Abiotic Disorders and Injury

http://www.forestpests.org/subject.html?SUB=758
    Summary:   A brief note on symptoms and causes of air pollution damage to plants, by the U.S. Forest Service. They also have a webpage that addresses herbicide damage on trees.

http://extension.orst.edu/benton/fortreedisease.html
    Summary:   A publicationout of Oregon by a Willamette Valley Extension agent. This is more like a disease note or the county agent's synopsis of much of the information available to small woodland owners in the West. While specifics are tailored for western landowners, many of the concepts apply here in the Southeast as well.

http://www.agnr.umd.edu/users/hgic/diagn/flow/environ_yellow.html
    Summary:  A page on various environmental stresses that can result in discoloration and chlorosis of plants (primarily horticultural) put out by the University of Maryland and the Maryland Cooperative Extension.

Return to the Abiotic Disorders and Injury profile


Parasitic Higher Plants

http://www.bio.vu.nl/vakgroepen/plantecologie/weeds/geninf.html
    Summary:   A brief and very general introduction to the botanical and ecological aspects of parasitic higher plants.

http://www.parasiticplants.siu.edu
    Summary:  A web-site out of Southern Illinois University, covers the life-cycle and natural history of mistletoe and many other parasitic plants.

http://www.na.fs.fed.us/pubs/fidls/ed%20mistletoe/ed_mistletoe.pdf
    Summary:  The USDA Forest Service Insect and Disease Leaflet (#NA-PR-04-06) covers incidence and management of Eastern dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobiun pusillum) on black spruce. Nicely illustrated.

http://www.colostate.edu/Depts/CoopExt/TRA/dodder.html
    Summary:   A brief extension service publication out of Colorado State that addresses the biology and control of dodder.

Return to the Parasitic Higher Plants disease profile


This page was last updated on 31 January 2008 by M.J. Munster
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

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